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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
back here tomorrow at 5:00. mad money starts right now. . . >> i'm jim cramer and welcome to my world. >> you need to get into the game. >> he's nuts! they're nuts! they know nothing. >> "mad money," you can't afford to miss i. hey, i'm cramer. welcome to requested mad money." others want to make friends, i'm trying to make money. my job is to make money, call me. earnings season. i dread earnings season. why? because it is overwhelming with so many companies reporting at once, so much data being thrown at you. because it's hard to deep track of expectations and what is better-than-expected. the whisper, what the real benchmark must be beaten is. no, it's because i have a really bad back. i can't stand carrying out those bad versions of conference calls in downtown manhattan to my studio here where i do "mad money." but tonight i want to do something difficult. i want to offer you a new way to use earnings season to put it in perspective, because most of you watching the show are not these day traders that hijack a lot of the thinking. because it has become so difficult to predict and
analyst jim walsh joins me here in a very chilly boston at this hour. gentlemen, we've been talking about this, you know, off and on this evening about the fbi. whether they dropped the ball. and a lot of monday morning quarterbacking going on. lou, to you in new york. it's too soon to tell, but there was certainly -- the fbi will certainly have to answer some questions after the older brother took a trip to russia and no one really followed up on that, lou. >> yes, i agree with you, don. i think there are some questions that need to be answered in the proper forum. i do think director muller and administrators of the fbi that had knowledge of the heads up they received from the russian government, sfb, their intelligence group, they'll have to explain exactly what transpired here and answer as to why they did or didn't do things. >> jim, it is bloelieved, everye has said they believe the brothers acted alone. is it too soon to tell? considering as much firepower they had and how some people thought they planned this out. >> yes. >> could there be someone else out there? >> i'm glad you a
analyst mr. jim walsh. he joins me here in boston. >> cold boston. >> everyone is asking me, is it that cold in boston? it is. >> you're clearly not a native new englander. you picked a bad spot. >> we're in a wind tunnel. i'll ask you since we are here talking. did the fbi drop the ball in interviewing the older tsarnaev brother? >> i mean at a very simple level, based just on the outcome you would have to say yes. he interviewed him and he went on to commit an act. but i don't think we have the full answer here yet. what was the process that they followed? the fbi interviews a ton of folks every year. only a fraction of which are actually dangerous. they interview me when i go to aroon and north korea and come back. but obviously either they -- he fell through the cracks or at the time that they were interviewing him they weren't giving him anything actionable to continue his case. >> but, lou, he did visit russia, stayed there for six months. you feel the fbi dropped the ball? >> i'm not going to rush to judgment on this. i think we're going to have hearings where directo
witherspoon apparently had trouble walking the line. her and husband jim tot were arrested and jailed early friday morning for an alleged dui and disorderly conduct. according to the police report, while toth was given a sprite test, reese claimed he was not a real police officer so she was handcuffed but not before telling the officer, quote, do you know my name? >> that never works. >> you're about to find out who i am, end quote. in a statement witherspoon said she clearly had too much to drink and is deeply embarrassed. >>> three doors down bassisted to harrell was charged with vehicular homicide after causing a fatal crash that killed a 47-year-old man. harrell was intoxicated and also in possession of over 30 assorted prescription pills. >>> in another entertainment news, "oblivion" easily took first at the box office with $38 million. jennifer lawrence presented bill clinton with a glaad media award and ended up flubbing the president's name. >> we are happy to present glaad advocate change award to president glib -- bill clinton. >> it happens to all of us, you know. it comes up, yo
durbin of illinois. >> suarez: and we sit down with the head of the world bank, jim yong kim, about his new push to tackle extreme poverty around the globe. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion
about you. >> very lovely. >>> someone we also think is lovely, cbs sportscaster jim nantz who we like. he reportedly had an elaborate plan to deal with the blackout at this year's super bowl. most of the superdome went dark in the third quarter. remember that? according to "sports business journal" says nantz he wanted to jump from the broadcast booth, grab a ledge and lower himself into the stands. from there, he wanted to run onto the field and report what was going on. lance barrow who was producing for cbs thought better of the idea and kept nantz in his seat. >> they're probably going thank you, lance barrow. doubt me, don't. jim nantz. >>> live television can be shall we say, a dicey thing, especially when mistakes can last forever on the internet. ben tracy shows us a north dakota tv news anchor who's learning that lesson the hard way. >> reporter: first days on the job can be tough. this one was awful. >> [ bleep ] gay. >> good evening, i'm van tieu. >> a.j. clemente apparently unaware he was on the air swore as he got flustered practicing his lines for hi
three deaths. cnn's jim spellman is in peoria, illinois. >> good morning, christine. you can see the waters coming up here. this is not too unusual here but it's got about another two feet to go. so far these sandbag levees are holding. they hope that remains the case. from north dakota to indiana, to mississippi. flad watches and warning throughout the middle of the country as rain water from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the rising illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move back into their home of 13 years. you were prepared, but what is it like to actually watch your home go under water? >> it's dev
, how would agent jim toth was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol. what is the says she was worried about her husband and clearly had one drink too many but asserted her respect for law enforcement. >> it is kind of surprising to hear her play that card. she was not in her right mind. she said she had one too many. she is trying to the vendor has been. that is what happens when they try to do that with police. >> let's look at weekend box office numbers and times cruises' new sci-fi thriller oblivion wince at the top spot at $38.2 million. in second place, 42 turning an estimated $18 million and running out the top three, though croods with an estimated $9.5 million. here is a view from mt. tam overlooking san francisco. temperatures are already beginning to warm up a bit, it will get hot later on beginning to warm up a bit, itnew nehoney bunches of oats greek yogurt and whole grain. herehe we go. honehoy corncoflakes and chunks of greek yogurt. i'i'm tasting both the yogurt and the honey at the same time. i'm like digging this yogurt thing. i feelfe healthy. new how ney
digital age. thank you. appreciate it. >> when we come back, we have jim cramer, stocks to watch and we'll talk about what has him fired up ahead of the opening bell. stick around. .. as soon as i met fiona and i was describing the problem we were having with our rear brakes, she immediately triaged the situation, knew exactly what was wrong with it, the car was diagnosed properly, it was fixed correctly i have confidence knowing that if i take to ford it's going to be done correctly with the right parts and the right people. get a free brake inspection and brake pads installed for just 49.95 after rebates when you use the ford service credit card. did you tell him to say all of that? no, he's right though... a lot can happen in a second. with fidelity's guaranteed one-second trade execution, we route your order to up to 75 market centers to look for the best possible price -- maybe even better than you expected. it's all part of our goal to execute your trade in one second. i'm derrick chan of fidelity investments. our one-second trade execution is one more innovative reason serious in
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim -- the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spaulding and the heritage foundation itself so valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case on conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, in outspoken partisanship is what almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on both sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. but negativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that liberals are for things, and conse
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning that we want to hit some of the highlights. we hope he will take the entire report, study it through and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i looked back in history to the time during world war ii that we in turn to some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do but in light of history, it was an error. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
, called it pure am necessary tifment jim sharp, a talk show host in phoenix promised that arizonans are still not taking this sitting down. on denny schaffer's show in new orleans, callsers demanded deportations. quote, i see nothing wrong with putting them on a bus and shipping them back to wherever they came from. a caller named alan told mr. schaffer, the law's the law. the senators filed their 844-page bill after 2:00 a.m. on wednesday. officially beginning what president obama and other supporters hope will be six-week effort to pass it in the senate by early june. hearings on the legislation, which tightens border security and offers an eventual path to citizenship, are set to begin on friday. that's from the "washington times." jacksonville, north carolina. arlene, good morning. democrat. caller: good morning. the gun background check situation. tammy baldwin was just on and she said something very interesting, she said, we already have background checks. so what's wrong with going a little bit more? and that's the problem. the problem is, you can't have a little bit. ce you
that this is the law of the land and going forward i think you will see that. >> host: one question from jim. he writes i'm 62 in good health, why not just go without until something comes of? >> guest: one reason is you will have to pay a fine. it's low in the first year, only $95. it goes up in a few years to 2% of hearing, or $700 or if you sign up for coverage although people worry the penalties are too low. but like anyone, as my mother used to tell me don't go a day without health insurance. you never know when you are going to have a concussion and you never know when you're going to be in a car accident. is it really a risk you want to take? >> host: going to ted from huntington new york on our republican line. good morning, you're on with jenny gold. >> caller: good morning. i would like to know about the policy you're in new york. i want to move out of new york. can this policy follow me you know to another state? or if -- >> host: do you have to change policies with each state you are in? is that what you're asking? >> caller: yes. >> guest: the thing about this lot is it's a state-by-state
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)